But dramatic improvements in numerical simulations helped to revive the field roughly five years ago—allowing scientists to recognize that the phenomenon might be more widespread. Gang Chen, an engineer at MIT, for example, was able to predict that second sound might be visible within graphite at rather balmy temperatures. That prediction electrified Duncan, who tested it just as soon as he could—eventually putting the rest of his pursuits on the back burner, once the results proved to be so counterintuitive.   
Sensations and feelings change much more dramatically than the physical signs. The user may feel several different emotions at once or swing rapidly from one emotion to another. If taken in a large enough dose, the drug produces delusions and visual hallucinations. The user’s sense of time and self changes. Sensations may seem to cross over, giving the user the feeling of hearing colours and seeing sounds. These changes can be frightening and can cause panic.
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